Phottix Odin II front White LRFirmware updates for the Phottix Mitros+ TTL Transceiver Flashes for Canon and Nikon are available for download. These upgrade will grant the Mitros+ the extra features found on the Phottix Odin II TTL Flash Trigger:

  1. Odin II Receiver Mode support for channel 5 to 32 added
  2. Support for Odin II Groups A-E (using channels 5 to 32) added
  3. Odin II Digital ID Function added

For download:

Mitros+ for Nikon v1.15

Mitros+ for Canon v2.10

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The new and improved Phottix Transfolder Softbox

The new and improved Phottix Transfolder Softbox

The Phottix Easy-Folder softbox has been improved and renamed during a recent contest. Meet the new Phottix Transfolder Softbox. The Transfolder softbox has stronger edges to minimize damage as well as an improved rear opening for using speed rings, studio lights, and the Phottix Cerberus Mount. The Transfolder is available as a softbox only or as a kit with the Cerberus Flash Mount and Varos Pro BG Mount.

Sizes

  • 40x40cm
  • 60x60cm
  • 60x60cm Deluxe Kit with Mask and Grid
  • 80x80cm

Several configurations of the Phottix Cerberus are available. Talk to you local Phottix dealer or buy from the Phottix Online Store.

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There’s a new mounting system in town – the Phottix Cerberus Multi Mount.

The Phottix Cerberus Multi Mount is your all-in-one mounting solution for hot shoe flashes. Use your hot shoe flashes with Bowens-compatible accessories, Elinchrom-compatible accessories, and the Phottix Transfolder Softbox range.

Phottix Cerberus Multi Mount with Elinchrom Mounting Ring

Phottix Cerberus Multi Mount with Elinchrom Mounting Ring

The Cerberus system comes with:

  • Phottix Griffin with Phottix Easy-Folder-Compatible Mount and Phottix Varos Pro BG *
  • Cerberus Elinchrom-Compatible Mount
  • Cerberus Bowens-Compatible Mount
  • Cerberus Phottix Transfolder-Compatible Mount

Like the mythical Cerberus, the Phottix Cerberus Multi Mount has three heads. The standard round mount works with the range of Phottix Transfolder Softboxes. Add the Bowen-compatible mount – and traditional S-Mount compatible accessories can be used with your hot shoe flash. Swap that out for the Elinchrom-compatible mount and use Elinchrom’s vast array of accessories with your hot shoe flash.

The durable and patented Phottix Griffin Universal Flash Mount holds many popular hot shoe flash models secure in a synthetic-lined spring-loaded clamp. The system was designed to be both durable and easy to use. A Phottix Varos Pro BG Umbrella Adapter is included to mount the Phottix Cerberus Multi Mount to a light stand or boom. The Phottiax Griffin is available on its own as well as being included with the Cerberus Multi Mount set. [click to continue…]

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Phottix Roadshow with Steven Neeson

The Phottix Roadshow featuring Steven Neeson, is coming to Dublin, Ireland, May 6-7. Steven is an award winning wedding photographer working from Northern Ireland who has quickly became one of the most sought after wedding photographers in his country. Photographing a large number of weddings per year, Steven has extensive knowledge in the requirements of making it as a successful photographer in the modern day.

The workshop will be held in The Maldron Hotel, Pearse Street, Dublin.  [click to continue…]

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The following is a guest post by Phottix Pro Teamer Bobbi Lane. 

Recently I had a great opportunity to photograph the Bellevue Ballet in Seattle for the PIX 2015 conference. Lee Varis and I set up a full length background, completely equipped with Phottix Indra lights, both the Indra 500 and the Indra 360, and shot 1000 images over 2 full days. My camera is the Fuji XT-1 and the 16-55mm 2.8 lens. We were on the convention hall floor with lots of people watching, and we let them shoot, too, and then Lee made prints for them!, The medium zoom was the perfect lens, allowing us to frame easily without having to go way out on the floor with a fixed telephoto. It’s necessary to have a medium telephoto to avoid shooting off the edge of the background. In a more controlled situation, I would have shot with the fixed 85mm f1.4, or the 50-140 f 2.8 zoom.

© Bobbi Lane

© Bobbi Lane

Full-length portraits in the studio depend upon two crucial elements: lighting that will define the shape and form of the body, and understanding that the body position IS the composition of the image. Although we did variations, my basic lighting set up was a 42” Luna Folding Octa Soft Box as my main light, and two Phottix Luna Folding Softboxes-12” x 60”. The 42” Octo has a medium wide coverage without too much spread, and the quality of light is very creamy. The strips are perfect for a soft directional light, in this case used to outline and highlight the shape, so they were placed on each side, slightly behind the dancers. The size of the light source should be somewhat proportional to the size of the subject. So the 60” strip lights are the correct size for full length images. Here’s the lighting set up. You can see the large soft box on camera left and the two strips behind.

I made many individual shots in various costumes, some with the ballerinas in flight. The main light wraps around the body from about 45 degrees, giving form and dimension from the shadows on the camera left side. The two strips add the rim light, which is an outline that emphasizes the shape. The strobe light freezes the motion because the flash duration is so short, so all movement is frozen. I did not use a fill light because I wanted the drama of the darker shadows.

I’m always totally blown away by the strength of these dancers and their ability to fly.

© Bobbi Lane

© Bobbi Lane

The same lighting set up works for two because that gorgeous Octa box covers well. It is important to make sure that one person does not block off the light of the other, so placement of the subject is crucial.

© Bobbi Lane

© Bobbi Lane

You can see in this photo that the ballerina on camera left has her face away from the main light, so only the strip from camera right is on her face. Nothing to do about that, as long as she is not in the dark!

They are so adorable! Ballerinas are amazing athletes and they support and care about each other.

Placing three ballerinas in the same shot is going to result in some light blockage. But just opening up the shadows a bit and dodging the face farthest from the light will balance it out.

The same Octa still give great coverage and the strips provide the rim light.

To create more drama, I sometimes chose to use only one or two lights. I love the elegance of this image and her pose, since she is anonymous because we don’t see her face.

Turning off the main light and just using the two strip lights gives us the rim light. I love the light that rakes across her back showing off the muscles, and the outline of the legs. A nice touch is that the tiara is lit up and so it her hair bun.

It’s such a beautiful and graceful pose. The beauty of the bodies and the elegance of the dance form are emphasized by the two strips. The light is coming from slightly behind, so the gray background gets darker, adding to the drama and making a great separation in tone from the rim light.

© Bobbi Lane

© Bobbi Lane

On the second day of shooting the ballerinas brought in costumes instead of the standard tutus. This particular costume was intriguing as it was designed to be like flower petals. During her dance, all the petals are up and enclose the dancer. As she dances, they are lowered revealing the beauty inside. Here I moved the main light to camera right and used just one strip box from camera left for the edge light. Her face is beautifully lit, the form of the body is defined and edge or rim light adds the drama.

© Bobbi Lane

© Bobbi Lane

This costume was fascinating and I had an idea for something different. Our set up was right next to a stairway, so I climbed up and shot down on her, using only the one strip light from camera left.

© Bobbi Lane

© Bobbi Lane

The material is like a mesh, so it was interesting how it took the light. And the shadows on the seamless are sharper because the strip is a harder light source.

This last costume was Puck from Midsummer’s Night Dream, so it called for more drama. Just the one main light from camera right and no fill so the shadows would go dark, adding to the theatricality. The pose helps, too!

© Bobbi Lane

© Bobbi Lane

She had a variation on the mask, so I did a tighter portrait with just the one light, making sure that her eyes were lit. She is an imp! Check out the eyelashes!

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To wrap it up, the Phottix Indras, which we used on battery only, had a fast recycle time and produced a consistent quality of light throughout the entire shoot. After shooting all day, the battery power was still at half, which is mind boggling. I can’t recall a situation that would have put the lights through as much work and they performed beautifully. Choosing the right tools allows more creative choices. And this was such a creative and fun shoot!

 

All copy and images © Bobbi Lane.

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